Grappa can be classified based on the variety of grape in the pomace from which it was distilled, and the extent to which it has been aged. In order for a drink to qualify as Grappa, it must meet several criteria: Grappa must be distilled from pomace, and the pomace must be distilled and fermented, without the addition of any water. At one time it also had to be produced in specific areas of Italy or Switzerland. This criterion has since been modified to allow blends distilled elsewhere in Europe and the United States to carry the Grappa name.

Grape Varieties…

Single or Mono-Variety Grappa…

This is grappa that has been distilled from pomace produced by a single and high-quality form of grape, such as Chardonnay, Moscato, Prosecco, Cabernet, or Pinot. These forms of grappa have strong characteristics related to the aroma of the grapes from which they are made.

Aromatised Grappa…

Aromatised Grappa is a blend that has had specific elements added to it in the final stage of distillation, in order to enhance its flavour. Various aromatic fruits, such as blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries, and herbs, such as liquorice, rue, and juniper, are used in this process.

Aromatic Grappa…

A form of grappa distilled from particular varieties of grape that are considered to be aromatic, such as Muscat, Traminer, Gewürztraminer, and Malvasia. There are also semi-aromatic forms, distilled from the pomace of Sauvignon, Chardonnay, and other semi-aromatic grapes.

Polivitigno Grappa….

Also known as poli-varietal or poly variety, this form of grappa is produced using a variety of different grapes in one distil, rather than a single type. Unlike other forms of grappa, no information is provided on the labels of Polivitigno concerning the origin of the grapes used in its production, because so many varieties are used in its creation.

Ageing…

Youth Grappa…

Youth or Young Grappa is exactly what it sounds like – grappa that has not been left to age for long. Grappa must be aged for at least six month after distillation, and young grappa can be aged for anything between six and twelve months. Young Grappa has a clean, dry taste and a delicate aroma.

Affinate Grappa…

This refers to grappa that has been carefully stored in wooden barrels as soon as it’s off the still, and aged for a year.

Vesshia and Invecchiata

This refers to older forms of grappa that have been stored for over twelve months. The majority of these have been aged for between twelve and eighteen months, however,‘Riserva’ is a specific variety that has been aged for over eighteen months.

Cask Conditioned Grappa…

This is grappa that has been stored in wooden casks to produce a particular effect during the ageing process, in much the same way one would condition whisky. Any variety of grappa can be cask conditioned, regardless of the blend of pomace used in distillation, or the length of time it is aged.

Giovanni Grappa…

Similar to cask conditioning, this form of grappa is stored in stainless steel containers, rather than wooden barrels. The form of container affects the taste, but as with cask conditioned grappa, it is the manner of storage that makes a grappa Giovanni, rather than the length of time it’s aged.

Blended Types of Grappa…

While there are various types of grappa, it’s perfectly possible to blend different categories together to create an entirely different classification with very specific traits. For example, Grappa Aromatica Monovitigno Stravecchia, or Monovitigno Riserva.

Types Of Dappa…

So what about our Dappa? Well we tend to distill our vintages in the early autumn, ready for sale out over Christmas and the New Year – therefore this would place our beloved spirit in the Youth grappa category which gives our dappa its distinct delicate & smooth flavour.

So why try a tipple? You can get a bottle from our shop here.